OWN IT! releases postcards to celebrate the One Year Publication anniversary of Stuart Goodman’s One Saturday In 82 On Broadway Market.

These black and white photos candidly picture the lives of shoppers and shop owners on this East London market in Hackney, which has since become unrecognisable. Preserving images of an East London landmark that has changed from desolation row to one of London’s trendiest markets.

One Saturday In 82 On Broadway Market also features Stuart Goodman’s account of his and Stephen Selby’s role in setting up a community initiative to save Broadway Market from demolition. Goodman speaks of the London that existed before gentrification. An East London native, brought up on a Hackney council estate, Goodman had lived in the market and been a shop keeper there for 6 months before photographing it for the first time.

In celebration of the one-year anniversary of publication, we are releasing three postcards of photographs from Stuart’s book.

With every purchase of his book One Saturday In 82 On Broadway Market, we’ll include a free postcard print.

If you’d like to purchase these prints, they are available at £1.50 each, or as a bundle of all 3 for £3.

Purchase ONE SATURDAY IN 82 ON BROADWAY MARKET HERE

Purchase postcards here:
(1 of 3)
(2 of 3)
(3 of 3)
Bundle of all 3

Visit Stuarts website to see more of his work here

Although we sadly lost the great Stuart Goodman, just over a year ago now (April 1st, 2020) his memory and his life live on through his work. Each of these photos capture a moment in time, a window into 1982 in Broadway Market and a window into the lives within it.

Golden Globe winner Idris Elba signs multi-book deal with HarperCollins

Photo by Maarten de Boer/Contour by Getty Images

We’re delighted to share that we’ve done an exciting deal for London/ New York: Iconic and multi award-winning actor, musician, filmmaker, and activist Idris Elba and Robyn Charteris who have signed a global multi-book deal with HarperCollins to publish a range of children’s books launching in 2022.

In a major UK/US co-publication deal, world rights were acquired by Ann-Janine Murtagh, Executive Publisher, HCCB UK, and Suzanne Murphy, President and Publisher, HCCB US, from OWN IT! founder and agent Crystal Mahey-Morgan.

Publishing will include picture books and young fiction, featuring a character and world imagined and developed by Idris and his talented writing partner Robyn Charteris, who has written numerous live-action drama, pre-school and animation programmes for BBC, Channel 4, the Jim Henson Company and Endemol as well as educational theatre for schools.

Idris Elba said, “I feel privileged to have the opportunity to bring stories inspired by my daughter to life with my incredible partner Robyn Charteris, and the powerhouse team at HarperCollins.”

Ann-Janine Murtagh said, “Idris Elba is one of the most iconic and multi-talented creatives of his generation and I am delighted that he is joining the HarperCollins Children’s Books list. From the outset, Idris had a very clear vision on the characters and stories he has imagined, and is passionate about creating books that will appeal to all children. Robyn Charteris has a fantastic track record in writing for children, working with some of the biggest producers of children’s entertainment, and I am hugely excited to also welcome her to the world of children’s books. I feel privileged that Idris has entrusted us to bring his stories to life and I cannot wait to share them with children across the globe.”

“Idris Elba is a creative force, who has many wonderful stories to tell,” says Suzanne Murphy. “We are honoured to be working with him and with Robyn Charteris to bring Idris’s rich and imaginative storytelling to the world of children’s books, and we are thrilled to welcome them to the HarperCollins family.”

JUDAS AND THE BLACK MESSIAH | FILM REVIEW | BY JUDE YAWSON

I have been unsure whether I wanted to review this film or not, as I felt the concepts that came into play are somewhat an injustice to the intentions and space the Black Panther Party attempted to create. However, after a few weeks of research, I came around to a satisfied state to speak on it. A strong disposition I have carried throughout my reviews so far is the importance of Black work in a multitude of mediums. Whether it is a film about a Black family unit and the lifelong affirmations so relatable, or the wonder of fantasy in a marvellous setting, a short film shedding an understanding of an unstudied space, or a historical show built to recognise a dramatic yet realistic state. In each of the Black works I review, there is a strong disposition of alleviating our struggles. I want to articulate and honour our community, as such ideas and realities became the making of me. Nevertheless, Judas & The Black Messiah is a film that unsettled that disposition of necessity by creation within me. It hurt my heart to watch, dampening my hope and soaked my misery in doubt, that by the end of it, left me morally debunked and slumped in depressive thought.

The first thing brought to my attention was questioning whether the film should exist or not. Although the enticing cast paused any form of protest that rocked within me. I thought, with the likes of Daniel Kaluuya, Lakeith Stanfield, the film being produced by Ryan Coogler, directed and written by a highly respected Shaka King, this is something I should see. I will never miss something Daniel Kaluuya is in, right now he is my favourite actor. Plus, I jump at any chance to learn more about the Black Panther Party. This was my enticement to the film. Judas & The Black Messiah is about the immoral endeavours of William O’Neal, an FBI informant, played by a dismayed Lakeith Stanfield, positioned in a Chicago branch of the Black Panther Party led by a young and aspiring Chairman Fred Hampton, played by the illustrious Daniel Kaluuya, who won a Golden Globe for the best supporting actor in a film with this performance. Daniel’s invested performance shines bright. He visited Hampton’s early homes, schools, speaking venues, and even discussed with students and former Panthers about the man’s life and legacy. Meeting Fred Hampton Jr and his mother Akua Njeri (Deborah Johnson) who is played by Dominique Fishback, added to his conception of Fred Hampton as a being. Jesse Plemons plays Roy Mitchell, the real FBI agent that facilitates the whole ordeal under the tutelage of J Edgar Hoover – the infamous FBI director that looms in that dark with sharp but lifechanging statements of action.

The film itself is a suspenseful and triggering piece, highlighting aspects of the great communal service and pride carried throughout the Black Panther Party. It shone a brief light on their political notions, the discipline carried out, the training and collective endeavours of people, as well as the networking Fred Hampton orchestrated between other disillusioned political groups that existed at the time. The score of the film is dark, looming, adding to the unease and enthusing aspect of the reality of the situation. Composed by Mark Isham and Craig Harris, the Jazz influence captures the sound of the times while adding to the entire aura of the films concept. It was such musical strings being pulled that lulled me into a rage at the situations at hand. It is mechanical, calculative, imposing, and exposing of a concerned heart. This was masterfully done. Although, alongside my building bitterness, it was in these moments of the films dialogue, intentions, situations and score blending together that prompted me to question its existence. Despite the tremendous job in summoning the emotions, inspiring a range of thoughts, its being unsettles me knowing there’s no happy ending in this story. The immorality of the situation bellows as if jabbing at history itself, that won’t change but can produce such historical thrillers such as these.

William O’Neal story as the Judas evokes no empathy within my heart despite the humanisation of the character. He is the centrepiece of the film, that studies his controlled relationship with the FBI and the tactics they utilised to undermine the party. It could be argued that due to the insidious nature of the FBI’s COINTELPRO, its Counterintelligence Programme that carried out covert and majorly illegal operations of surveillance, infiltration, discrediting, and generally destroying domestic American political organisations, that it was not entirely to the fault of the manipulated informants. Nevertheless, empathy can only go so far. Regardless of the realities Black people faced, William O’Neal allowed himself to be a pawn for the downfall of a Black community. The Civil Rights Movement, as well as Black Power Movements, were prime targets during the 60s and 70s of these endeavours. William O’Neal was, one of countless people who were subjects utilised in these tactics. Though that doesn’t erase the fact he was a snitch looking out for his own self. Speaking to film reviewers at the African American Film Critics Association, Lakeith Stanfield voice cracks a bit as he thanked a critic for asking him about how he felt during this whole film process – something almost totally ignored throughout the whole ordeal.

This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows Lakeith Stanfield, left, and Jesse Plemons in a scene from “Judas and the Black Messiah.” (Warner Bros. Pictures via AP)

Lakeith highlighted the role ignited a depression within him, he suffered from panic attacks on set, sleepless nights, sheer confusion at becoming this character and questioned whether it was the right decision at all. He had to go to therapy in order to alleviate the stress accumulated in playing William O’Neal. When he first received the script, he was enthused at the idea of playing Fred Hampton – only to be informed it was William O’Neal he would perform. This was going to be a challenge, but as an actor it wasn’t an opportunity to shy way from. Joining him in this interview, Fred Hampton Jr and Daniel Kaluuya offered their insights to the reality behind the film – making a fantastic roundtable discussion of it. Jr went on to highlight, it was important such a film was created in order to show the reality behind FBI & Governance involvement in subjugating their efforts. People needed to heed the inhumane tactics of psychological warfare, manipulation and general undoing of them. Jr also added that these modern-day tactics and technologies have existed for so long, such as wiretapping, listening to conversations via phone, speakers that can allow you to hear conversations from within a building if just pointed at it, facial manipulation to change identities among other practices to ensure the destruction of such movements. He even noted the fact that when William O’Neal passed, he and his Mother, Deborah Johnson, renamed Akua Njeri, attended his funeral to pay their disrespects and ensure he was dead and buried. However, at the open casket – they came to realise that the body and face was not of the William O’Neal they remembered – adding to the mystery of the FBI and their practices.

I felt comforted at the idea that Fred Hampton Jr and his mother essentially gave their blessings to the creation of this film, and less fiery at its existence. However, another glaring issue I recognised was raised by Noname, a Chicago native rapper that has a passion for hands on community work. She is not merely an activist, but someone who is vocal in teaching and helping others learn a discourse to understanding politics and community. She denied the opportunity in being a part of a soundtrack, stating after she witnessed the film she decided to pull out of it. Which for many implied her politics doesn’t align with the creation or content of the film itself. Like with the fantastic film score, the film itself, the soundtrack also alienated me by being a product of the same system the Panthers fought against. The film and its ideas became a culture product to produce worth over political action. Recently, Noname raised a headquarters for her reading club that intends to provide political education classes, book & food drives, host a radically filled library, provide free art shows and film screenings. A wholesome and free space that doesn’t intend to wait for the same Government that orchestrated the downfall of such in the 60s and 70s to act. It is such political inclinations that the film lacked. Although some intentions were pointed toward, such as the equality of opportunity and respect by gender, the community watch and monitoring of policing, the cooperation between the Panthers and other political movements. Despite such, as a film – the political incantations can only be injected so far. If there was a film intending to flesh out the philosophy and political endeavours of the Black Panther Party, a film focused on the snitch wouldn’t be it. I do hold hope that, likewise with myself, such communal interests no matter how little detailed can inspire people to act within their own. We can share, educate, and work to each other’s benefit without needing a Government known for disenfranchising life itself.

JUDAS AND THE BLACK MESSIAH DANIEL KALUUYA (right) as Chairman Fred Hampton

To conclude, I would say Judas & The Black Messiah is a must-see film if you adore passionate performances of brightening dark moments within history. Although the reality behind its existence offers a shallow feeling. Hence, I’d also say, if you are not a fan of trauma and carry a heavy heart you do not need to rush to see it. The spectacle has seemingly been enlightening for the cast, studying crew, and filmmakers themselves. I hope such can shed onto others, like it has with myself, and the endeavours of the Black Panthers strike a chord within them to embark on something similar. It is a shame that Blackness embodies politics in most cultural products and serves as something we can utilise in a learning space. But I guess, this has become a tragic reality of Blackness in white societies.

ONE SATURDAY IN 82 ON BROADWAY MARKET – Stuart Goodman

These black and white photos candidly picture the lives of shoppers and shop owners on this East London market in Hackney, which has since become unrecognisable. A SATURDAY IN 82 ON BROADWAY MARKET preserves images of an East London landmark that has changed from desolation row to one of London’s trendiest markets.


Also featuring Stuart Goodman’s account of his and Stephen Selby’s role in setting up a community initiative to save Broadway Market from demolition, Goodman speaks of the London that existed before gentrification. An East London native, brought up on a Hackney council estate, Goodman had lived in the market and been a shop keeper there for 6 months before photographing it for the first time…

…37 years later, OWN IT! are proud to publish his photographs in a new book, at a time when the market has changed beyond belief.

Scholastic partners with Black Cultural Archives to celebrate Windrush generation

THE PLACE FOR ME: STORIES OF THE WINDRUSH GENERATION


The anthology will include contributions from OWN IT! family: Kevin George, Salena Godden, Ashley Hickson-Lovence, Jermain Jackman, Kirsty Latoya and Quincy The Comedian.


Read the full article here


KEVIN GEORGE

Kevin George is a Clinical Consultant, professionally trained in Person-Centred Therapy (Counselling). Specialising in group programmes, to develop emotional literacy. These programs have been delivered in schools, prisons and Premier League football clubs nationally. 

Kevin is the Author of the Amazon number one best selling book Soccology. A book about the psycho-emotional elements of football. Featuring 45 professional footballers from around the world and across generations, along with a Psychophysicist and a Senior Partner from KPMG. He has also written for international publications such as the British Council, Sky Sports and GQ, on all things mental health.


SALENA GODDEN

Salena Godden is a high-profile poet. She is also an activist, broadcaster, essayist and memoirist whose work has been widely anthologised. The Royal Society of Literature made her a fellow FRSL in November 2020. 

Canongate published Salena’s debut novel Mrs Death Misses Death in 2021. A BBC documentary following the early work-in-progress was broadcast on Radio 4 and BBC World Service in 2018. It’s described by the publisher as “intoxicating and life-affirming” and in The Bookseller as “an original, exuberant novel, freewheeling from prose to poetry to non-fiction, truly one of a kind.”


ASHLEY HICKSON-LOVENCE

Ashley Hickson-Lovence is a former secondary school English teacher who grew up on a Hackney council estate and now resides in Norwich while he completes a Creative and Critical Writing PhD at the University of East Anglia. He is particularly interested in capturing the incessantly changing cultural landscape of urban Britain. Hickson-Lovence is also a poet, football referee and a keen marathon runner.

He is also the author of debut novel The 392, set entirely on a London bus travelling from Hoxton to Highbury and taking place over just 36 minutes.


JERMAIN JACKMAN

Jermain Jackman, born and raised in Hackney, East London, combines his musical talent with pursuing his role as a political activist. Jackman first caught the nation’s attention after winning BBC talent show The Voice in 2014.

Jermain is now actively using his voice to make political interventions which seek to create a fairer future for the children and young people in Hackney and beyond. Through his work as the Chair of the Young Futures Commission and advising capacity with the National Citizens Service, Jermain is raising awareness of how the youth of London are feeling disenfranchised and left without opportunities.


KIRSTY LATOYA

Kirsty Latoya, also known as KirzArt is a South London illustrator who specialises in mental health art. Having always drawn as a child Kirsty taught herself digital art 2 years ago and this is now her chosen medium. She uses her iPad to create art and uniquely uses her finger as a stylus. She draws on her own experiences with depression and anxiety to produce eye-catching digital paintings portraying her representation of mental health. Kirsty’s art has been recognised on reported on by the BBC, ITV, Channel 5, Huffington Post and Buzzfeed to name a few. Kirsty is driven by her passion and inspired by the unconventional beauty in the world.

Kirsty Latoya has published a book of art and poetry entitled Reflections of Me – made up of four sections – mental health, identity, womanhood and love – and images are accompanied by original poems from Kirsty.


QUINCY THE COMEDIAN

Award-winning Comedian Quincy, also known as the Cockney Prince, is a stand-up comic and radio talk show host. A regular on the British stand up circuit since 2005, Quincy has performed all over the world, including New York, Singapore, Dubai, India and Europe. He has supported the likes of an early Kevin Hart, Chris Rock, Dave Chappelle and other top comics from the USA.

In 2010 Quincy set up Quincy’s Comedy Lounge, enabling him to share his love of comedy by showcasing up and coming comedians from the mainstream and the black comedy scene. Catch him every Friday on Youtube/STOMPING PICTURES socials for EXTRA TIME FRIDAY.